Follow us
Publications Commentary Research People Events News Resources and Videos About IFS
Home People Luke Sibieta
Luke Sibieta

Luke Sibieta

Research Fellow

Education

MSc Economics (Distinction), University College London, 2008

BSc Economics (1st Class), London School of Economics, 2005

Luke is a Research Fellow attached to the Education, Employment and Evaluation sector. His general research interests include education policy, political economy and poverty and inequality. In the recent past, he has conducted research into the following specific areas: school funding; the impact of the home learning environment on child outcomes; trends in top incomes; trends in child poverty and income inequality; and the politics of tax policy.

Academic outputs

IFS Working Paper W21/24
Using a large and novel administrative dataset, this paper investigates variation in returns to different higher education ‘degrees’ (subject-institution combinations) in the United Kingdom.
Journal article | Fiscal Studies, Volume 36, No. 3, September 2015
This article looks at School Spending in England 2010–15.

Reports and comment

Observation
In most of our analysis of education spending, we focus on spending in England to ensure comparability. In this observation, we expand our analysis to show the level and changes to school spending per pupil across the four nations of the UK.
Observation
At its recent conference, the Labour party committed to removing charitable status from private schools and the associated exemptions from VAT and business rates. The extra funding would then be used to increase state school spending and would be targeted at pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds. ...

Presentations

Presentation
Further and higher education providers face severe resource challenges as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. At this event, IFS researchers and panellists Philip Augar and Mary Curnock Cook analysed these challenges.
Presentation
IFS researchers presented the key findings from their second annual report on education spending in England, supported by the Nuffield Foundation, providing consistent measures of day-to-day spending per pupil in England across the four main stages of education stretching back to the early 1990s.